Best Paint Colors Of All Time, According to Designers

Hey there beautiful junkers!

Okay, let's cut to the chase! We have here paint color suggestions that will help you skip the do-overs and pick the perfect color of paint for that ceiling, wall and project for just the first time around. How? Well simple, we collated what the pros and expert designers recommend!

Here are designer paint color suggestions, the best paints all in one place!


1. Autumn Purple, Benjamin Moore
“This sophisticated, rich hue of berry purple is my favorite bold color right now,” Paquin says. “It’s daring yet inviting, and lends tons of warmth to a space. It’s not too masculine or feminine, and works in every environment.” Paquin recommends it in dining rooms, powder rooms, or as a high-gloss lacquer on built-ins in a home office.
- coastalliving.com



2. Lavender Mist, Benjamin Moore
"People underestimate the power of lavender," Mary McGee told House Beautiful. Pale orchid livens up this entryway's walls while keeping rooms light and airy.
- goodhousekeeping.com



3. Charleston Gray, Farrow & Ball
"Hands down my favorite gray paint is Charleston Gray by Farrow & Ball. It’s a deep, sumptuous shade of gray that wraps you like a velvety fog. I use it when I’m trying to create intimacy in an oversized space, or warmth in small room with little natural light." - Patrick Ediger
- elledecor.com



4. Winter's Gate, Pratt & Lambert
"This color has the ideal hint of color for homeowners that may be too shy to jump out of their beige comfort zone. It's light enough to read as a neutral and is a beautiful balance for bright white trim. It's ultra versatile on ceilings, as it complements both light and dark wall colors." - James Wheeler
- elledecor.com



5. Gervase Yellow
"When I'm using a color rather than a neutral for walls, I pick in the golden range. With a little tone of green peeking through, this yellow is not so intense that it's overly dramatic. It's warm and embracing - not one of those overly cheerful yellows. It's a subtle yellow you'll never tire of." - Barry Dixon, Washington, D.C., designer
- bhg.com



6. Blue Arrow
"Easy on the eye, easy to live with. It's a robin's egg blue-green with a bit of muddiness to it. I always like my colors a little muddy." - Melissa Birdsong, Lowe's vice president of trend design and brand
- bhg.com



7. Silver Chain, Benjamin Moore
A beautiful soft gray that goes from a warm gray to a lighter lavender—in any type of light or room exposure.” - Darci Hether, interior designer
- cottage-gardens.com



8. Million Dollar Red, Bejamin Moore
It’s dark enough to look rich and bright enough to feel fresh. I like using it in sitting rooms and libraries.” - Phillip Thomas, interior designer
- cottages-gardens.com



9. Razzle Dazzle, Benjamin Moore
"Entryways are all about first impressions. Get off on the right foot with a statement-making hue, like Benjamin Moore's Razzle Dazzle."
- housebeautiful.com



10. Weekend Getaway, Benjamin Moore
"Whether you want a brighter start to the day or an at-home spa, there's a just-right shade waiting in the wings."
- housebeautiful.com



11. Bermuda Turquoise, Benjamin Moore
Small, transitional spaces such as foyers and powder rooms are prime places to go big with color,” says Jennifer Jones of Niche Interiors in San Francisco. “I love Bermuda Turquoise—this rich, saturated jewel tone is especially beautiful in a high-gloss finish.
- coastalliving.com



12. Salmon Peach, Benjamin Moore
You can't go wrong with pairings found in nature (hello peonies!). Amanda Lindroth choose this blush-like hue to contrast with the pops of green. "The palette is based on the apple painting, which I inherited from my mother," the designer told House Beautiful.
- goodhousekeeping.com



13. Garden Stone, Clark + Kensington
"I try to stay away from colors with heavy blue undertones, and I direct my clients toward warm grays that will stand the test of time," say Ace design expert Katie Reynolds. "This shade is a favorite."
- goodhousekeeping.com



14. Cheating Heart, Benjamin Moore
"The biggest fear to overcome when using a dark color is that it will make your room feel smaller. Not true! A dark color makes the walls seem to disappear and adds incredible drama to a room. This charcoal has just the right amount of brown in it to add warmth. It's as gorgeous on walls as it is on millwork and trim. I've even used it on the bottom of a claw foot tub." - Jen Going
- elledecor.com